YouTube Revamps Its Kids App

Looks like Google has responded swiftly to the article from Sunday’s NY Times highlighted yesterday in Tablettoddlers.

From the MediaPost article: Google’s YouTube has released an updated version of YouTube Kids, a version of the video app that features age-appropriate content and more restricted advertising.

The revamped app allows users to create multiple profiles for their kids. The profiles will also change as the child ages, with younger users seeing more pictures and less text, while older users get more content on the homescreen.

The new profiles will work across all devices that have the app.

Kids will also be able to set their own passcode for their profile to keep their siblings out, though parents will be able to override it. Parents will also be able to select and tailor programming for their kids when they first set up the profiles in the app.

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On YouTube Kids, Startling Videos Slip Past Filters

Here’s a story from the Sunday New York Times about YouTube Kids.  The app has more than 11 million weekly viewers. But some disturbing knockoff videos have reached children, upsetting parents.  The takeaway:

“Parents and children have flocked to Google-owned YouTube Kids since it was introduced in early 2015. The app’s more than 11 million weekly viewers are drawn in by its seemingly infinite supply of clips, including those from popular shows by Disney and Nickelodeon, and the knowledge that the app is supposed to contain only child-friendly content that has been automatically filtered from the main YouTube site.  But the app contains dark corners, too, as videos that are disturbing for children slip past its filters, either by mistake or because bad actors have found ways to fool the YouTube Kids algorithms.”

YouTube Announces New Features for Kids App

YouTube has unveiled new features for its kids app, a move that underscores the video platform’s efforts to make the app more family-friendly.  “When we announced the app, we said YouTube Kids was our first step in reimagining YouTube for families,” the Google-owned video platform said in a blog post. Users will now be able to watch content from the app on a TV screen using Chromecast, Apple TV, game consoles or a smart TV. They can also explore videos on guest-curated playlists from National Geographic Kids, Kid President and others.

Silicon Valley aims for toddler tech, but is all that YouTube good for them?