Podcast Makers Hook Pint-Size Listeners

According to a the Wall Street Journal article, audio producers are attracting the next generation of fans with programs like ‘Chompers’—a twice-daily, two-minute show that coincides with teeth-brushing time. Children today don’t typically have direct access to podcasts—they often tune in on their parents’ phones instead—but industry watchers believe that smart speakers will help change that.

Industry watchers believe that smart speakers will help make podcasts a larger part of children’s media consumption.

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Apple and Perkins School for the Blind partner to teach kids how to code

The program is meant to make technology more accessible to visually-impaired students at the Watertown school.  Click here for more.

*Full disclosure:  Tablettoddlers.com CBO Craig Sender is Director of Media and Public Relations at Perkins School*

perkins school for the blind

Teachers, parents divided on technology

There is a wide gap between teachers and parents concerning technology, with teachers saying it has harmed students’ mental and physical health, according to a majority of educators participating in a recent Gallup survey. Parents surveyed were more likely to say that technology helps support students’ mental and physical health.

Check out this Washington Post article for more.

Is Tech Affecting Students’ Handwriting?

Increasing use of technology has affected students hand strength leading to difficulty holding pens and pencils, says Sally Payne of the Heart of England foundation NHS Trust. Activities such as cutting, playing with building blocks and pulling ropes can help students develop proper writing grip, Payne notes.

Check out this Guardian article for more.

Teacher and children

America’s Real Digital Divide

From an interesting op-ed in today’s NY Times:

“A group of former Facebook and Google employees last week began a campaign to change the tech companies they had a hand in creating. The initiative, called Truth About Tech, aims to push these companies to make their products less addictive for children — and it’s a good start.  But there’s more to the problem. If you think middle-class children are being harmed by too much screen time, just consider how much greater the damage is to minority and disadvantaged kids, who spend much more time in front of screens.”