Teachers, parents divided on technology

There is a wide gap between teachers and parents concerning technology, with teachers saying it has harmed students’ mental and physical health, according to a majority of educators participating in a recent Gallup survey. Parents surveyed were more likely to say that technology helps support students’ mental and physical health.

Check out this Washington Post article for more.

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Is Tech Affecting Students’ Handwriting?

Increasing use of technology has affected students hand strength leading to difficulty holding pens and pencils, says Sally Payne of the Heart of England foundation NHS Trust. Activities such as cutting, playing with building blocks and pulling ropes can help students develop proper writing grip, Payne notes.

Check out this Guardian article for more.

Teacher and children

The New York Times Makes Kids Section Monthly

From today’s MediaPost newsletter:

The New York Times is rolling out a monthly print-only section for kids, in response to positive feedback the Times received when it debuted its first Kids section in May.

The second edition of the Kids section will appear in the Sunday, November 19 edition of the newspaper. It becomes a regular monthly section next year, starting January 28.

 

‘Schoolifying’ Minecraft Without Ruining It

Still from the game Minecraft (Photo courtesy of Martin Gee for NPR)

Teachers are using Minecraft, the popular game that allows players the chance to build a 3-D world out of “blocks,” in every imaginable subject, from literature to social studies to math. Build a 3-D diorama of an archaeological dig; retell a Japanese folktale; test bridge designs in different materials and build video games within the game. Read how teachers and developers are trying to bring Minecraft into classrooms without ruining the fun.

Teaching Kids Coding, by the Book

Here’s an excerpt from this nice article from NY Times article about the great organization, Girls Who Code:

“One sunny summer morning this month, a group of 20 teenage girls gathered in a conference room in the sleek offices of a tech company in Manhattan. It was their fifth week of coding camp, and they were huddled around laptops, brainstorming designs for their final projects. One group was building a computer game that simulates the experience of going through life with depression and anxiety, while others were drafting plans for websites that track diversity at companies and help connect newly arrived immigrants with local community groups.”