A Digital Whizz-Kid Asks ‘What’s a Computer?’ in Apple’s Spot for IPad Pro

From the Ad Age post with link to video –

The latest iPad film from Apple just about sums up how life is for kids today: their world is digital, but they don’t know what a “computer” is.

The beautifully shot ad follows a day in the life of a young independent girl who sets out to explore with only an iPad Pro and her bike. Along the way, she chats to a friend and virtually signs his plaster cast, uses Apple Pencil to turn a puddle into an aquatic scene, compiles a quick newsletter and flips through a comic strip.

At the end of the spot, her mom asks her “What are you doing on your computer?” “What’s a computer?” she asks innocently. It’s charming. And scary. What’s more, she’s lying on the grass next to an Apple logo.

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The New York Times Makes Kids Section Monthly

From today’s MediaPost newsletter:

The New York Times is rolling out a monthly print-only section for kids, in response to positive feedback the Times received when it debuted its first Kids section in May.

The second edition of the Kids section will appear in the Sunday, November 19 edition of the newspaper. It becomes a regular monthly section next year, starting January 28.

 

YouTube Revamps Its Kids App

Looks like Google has responded swiftly to the article from Sunday’s NY Times highlighted yesterday in Tablettoddlers.

From the MediaPost article: Google’s YouTube has released an updated version of YouTube Kids, a version of the video app that features age-appropriate content and more restricted advertising.

The revamped app allows users to create multiple profiles for their kids. The profiles will also change as the child ages, with younger users seeing more pictures and less text, while older users get more content on the homescreen.

The new profiles will work across all devices that have the app.

Kids will also be able to set their own passcode for their profile to keep their siblings out, though parents will be able to override it. Parents will also be able to select and tailor programming for their kids when they first set up the profiles in the app.

On YouTube Kids, Startling Videos Slip Past Filters

Here’s a story from the Sunday New York Times about YouTube Kids.  The app has more than 11 million weekly viewers. But some disturbing knockoff videos have reached children, upsetting parents.  The takeaway:

“Parents and children have flocked to Google-owned YouTube Kids since it was introduced in early 2015. The app’s more than 11 million weekly viewers are drawn in by its seemingly infinite supply of clips, including those from popular shows by Disney and Nickelodeon, and the knowledge that the app is supposed to contain only child-friendly content that has been automatically filtered from the main YouTube site.  But the app contains dark corners, too, as videos that are disturbing for children slip past its filters, either by mistake or because bad actors have found ways to fool the YouTube Kids algorithms.”

My own iPad? Yeah, I’ve got that, say 42 percent of American kids

Common Sense Media, a San Francisco nonprofit that studies children’s relationship with technology, just released a survey showing an enormous spike in mobile media use by children 8 and under: Mobile is having a big impact on the youngest members of society.

The study found that nearly half of kids 8 and younger — 42 percent — have a tablet of their own, up from less than 1 percent who owned their own tablets in 2011.