Google’s New App Lets Parents Turn Old Tablets Kid-Friendly

From The Verge:

Google’s Family Link app lets parents hand down their old Android gadgets to their kids without worrying about what they could end up downloading from the Play Store or finding online. They just have to create a Google account for their kids and download the app, which went public Thursday.

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The Texts are Coming From Inside the House

“Some parents, spouses, teenagers … are finding that texting [each other inside the same house] can sometimes actually make a household run more smoothly,” according to a Boston Globe front-pager by Beth Teitell:

  • “Tired and hungry after a day of high school and sports, Isaiah Ramsey likes to collapse on his bed, grab his phone, and place a mobile dinner order. To his mom. In the next room.”
  • “Digital natives who are accustomed to summoning everything from their phones — restaurant meals, consumer goods, Uber — are lounging in their rooms and tapping out requests for service from their parents. ‘Can you bring my charger?'”
  • “Parents who were initially horrified at the seemingly impersonal communication mode have not only made their peace with it — they’re deploying it themselves. ‘It’s the only reliable way to reach them when they’re upstairs,’ said Remi Dansinger, a mother of three … They are always looking at their phones — at Snapchat or Instagram — so they can’t pretend they don’t see my messages.'”

It’s 10 P.M. Do You Know What Apps Your Children Are Using?

From the NY Times post:

A guide to what parents will (or should) be anxiously monitoring during this busy back-to-school season:

Video-Messaging Apps – Marco PoloHouse Party and FireChat

Yellow – which has been called “Tinder for teens” (swipe right if you want to become friends with someone; swipe left if you don’t)

Anonymous Apps – After SchoolSarahahSayAt.MeMonkey and Ask.Fm

Ephemeral Apps – Many adults have heard of Snapchat and Instagram Stories, but what about Live.ly, a rising live-streaming app with a large teenage audience?