Dad Time With The Olympics

Recently, I had the chance to sample some of the Rio Olympics TV viewing experience at a Comcast event in Boston.  Here’s what I learned…

For Rio, Comcast has created an Olympics destination on X1, offering customers a place to easily search, discover and access more than 6,000 hours of NBC’s Olympic programming available throughout the Games.  The Road to Rio homepage is accessible through the main menu, which Comcast has enhanced to offer easy, instant access to real-time Olympic coverage as well as Front Row to Rio and customized content.  Customers will also have the ability to personalize their Olympics experience by using the “favorite” feature on X1 to easily follow the athletes, teams and nations they care about most and navigate the entire Olympics experience with the sound of their voice using the X1 voice remote (in English or Spanish).

With the integrated X1 Sports app, customers can search and explore the latest medal counts, live results, and real-time stats for events, as well as browse all live and streaming programming schedules, select the specific event live stream they would like to view, and watch the latest highlights of their favorite events and athletes on demand.

Plus, X1 customers can also access GoldZone right on the TV or on their mobile device to watch any Olympics match that will result in medals for the winners.

And, there’s no worries about missing any of the action with real-time notifications around must-see moments, the ability to select from broadcast or specific online streaming coverage of individual events and catch up on the Opening and Closing Ceremonies, or any edition of the full NBC primetime show, available the next day on Xfinity On Demand.

Tablettoddlers is looking forward to watching the Olympics with the kids.

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What’s the Right Age for a Child to Get a Smartphone?

Very relevant topic for Tablettoddlers in this NY Times piece:

“The longer you wait to give your children a smartphone, the better. Some experts said 12 was the ideal age, while others said 14. All agreed later was safer because smartphones can be addictive distractions that detract from schoolwork while exposing children to issues like online bullies, child predators or sexting.”

 

 

Can ‘Minecraft’ Really Change the Way Teachers Teach?

From the Motherboard post:

“Not every teacher is going to have the creativity to create good lesson plans that incorporate Minecraft, either. That’s where education.minecraft.net plays a role. While it’s somewhat limited right now, the website already has a host of resources including lesson plans educators can use. Eventually, Quarnstrom told me that the website will be a hub for the community to share and vote on lesson plans, creating an endless resource for teachers who might lack an intimate enough understanding of Minecraft to develop their own.”

Parents Following Their Kids to Snapchat

Is coolness done for Snapchat? That’s what Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had to admit in 2013 as teens fled his social media platform for the Venice upstart once their parents started to join. Now Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel may have to face the same reality, as his ephemeral messaging app is growing in popularity among older demographics.

According to a recent comScore report, the percentage of Snapchatters among smartphone users age 25 and up has multiplied by seven in the past three years. Some 38 percent of older millennial smartphone users age 25-34 use the app, and 14 percent of those 35 and older do, up from 5 percent and 2 percent three years ago.

Snapchat

10 Children’s Apps for Summer Road Trips

From this timely post in the NY Times:

“The car is packed, the pets have sitters and the GPS is programmed. But have you properly prepped your children’s devices?  While there are many apps that can keep a child busy, the best are those designed to promote active, engaged, meaningful and social learning, researchers say. 

The NY Times details some recent apps for the job. Most work without a Wi-Fi tether, are free or very affordable and are rich in bite-size bits of interaction, making them easy to pass around the car. Platform and price information change frequently, so check your favorite app store for the latest information.