Twitter Launches Vine Kids App

Check out the video here.

From the Vine blog post:

We’ve seen for ourselves – and heard from parents, siblings and others – that kids love Vine. So, we built Vine Kids, a simple new app that gives young children a fun way to watch Vines.

Through adorable animated characters, kids can watch videos that are appropriate for a young audience. Swiping right or left shows a new Vine, and you can tap the screen to hear quirky sounds.

Here’s the link to the App store.

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Digital Books Fine For Kids

Despite popular claims, digital books aren’t turning our kids’ brains to mush according to this post from Jeremy Greenfield of TheStreet.com.  From the piece:

“Despite years of reports of angsty parents uncomfortable with putting their children to sleep to warm glow of an iPad, evidence that digital reading is bad for your kids is scattered. The American Academy of Pediatrics’ recent recommendation that children under two-years-old have no “screen time” is not based on any data, the organization has admitted. A recent New York Times article cited several studies that suggest a parent and child reading a print book together has added benefits over doing the same in digital.”

Teens Still Prefer Print, But For How Long?

From the EContent article:

Article ImageRead an old-style, no-batteries-required, turn-too-fast-and-get-a-paper-cut kind of book lately?

Chances are many of the teenage bookworms you know have as well. Teens are showing a preference for good ole printed books as industry watchers consider the roots of the connection and the impact on publishing.

Recent figures from the measurement firm Nielsen tell the tale: 54% of teens ages 13 to 17 strongly or generally prefer print, with 28% having no preference, and 18% strongly or generally preferring ebooks, according to Nielsen’s “Understanding the Children’s Book Consumer in the Digital Age: Fall 2014 report.”

A Self-Publishing Platform for Kids

From the GalleyCat post:

Lulu Jr., the children’s division of the self-publishing platform Lulu.com, has teamed up with educational software firm FableVision Learning for a new venture called My Awesome Publishing Company!, a self-publishing platform for kids.

The online book publishing platform teaches kids how to create a book from idea to print edition. The tool guides young writers through writing, production, marketing and distribution until they ultimately publish their own book.

 

Keeping Kids Connected During Long Winter Days

From snow days to holiday breaks, kids will be off from school often over the next few months. And with the inclement weather, this means they are inside, itching for something to do. Instead of watching TV or fighting with siblings, using the Internet is a more interactive, productive choice for kids of all ages.

Unfortunately about 30 percent of Americans, many of whom live below the poverty line, don’t have Internet access in their homes. To help connect these families to the Internet, Comcast is offering a low-cost broadband adoption program called Internet Essentials.

Internet Essentials offers families with at least one child eligible for the National School Lunch Program Internet for $9.95 a month; the option to buy a laptop or desktop computer for less than $150; and access to digital literacy training online, in person or in print.

With a service such as this, kids can connect to fun online educational activities for free while they are off from school, and they can keep up with their assignments and stay connected to teachers and classmates. This way, they are not only keeping busy, but they are learning.  Here are a few cool sites:

–          Khan Academy (khanacademy.org): Get a personalized experience in math, biology, economics, computer science, art history and more.

–          PBS Kids (pbskids.org): Find learning games associated with your favorite PBS Kids characters like Clifford, Curious George and The Cat in the Hat.

–          FunBrain (funbrain.com): Access a ton of activities; read books and comics; and play mad libs, math baseball and tic tac toe.

Plus, the whole family can use Internet at home this winter to stay in touch with loved ones, search for new healthy recipes to start the year off right, fill out tax returns and apply for financial aid.

So far, more than 350,000 families, or about 1.4 million low-income Americans, have been connected to the power of the Internet through Internet Essentials. There is also a new amnesty program for families who would qualify for the program, but have a past due balance. If they meet all other eligibility criteria, Comcast will offer amnesty for a bill that is more than one year old in order for that family to be eligible.

To learn more or apply, visit www.InternetEssentials.com or call 1-855-846-8376, or for Spanish, visit www.InternetBasico.com or call 1-855-765-6995. Educators and third parties can visit www.InternetEssentials.com/Partner.

Digital Book World Takes a Look at Growth in Kids’ E-Reading

According to a Digital Book World blog post, “…while device popularity – e-readers, tablets, smartphones, computers – shifts from year to year, the overall take-up of digital books is huge and growing. 92% of kids 2–13 now e-read at least once a week.

Tablettoddlers will be attending the annual Digital Book World Conference Jan. 13-15 at the NY Hilton in midtown Manhattan.  Drop us a line if you’d like to meet up.